8,716 average net delivery, period ending March 2019
April 27, 2020
In this issue
Aus economy predicted to lose $35. 7 billion from cancelled business events
Are you experiencing Zoom fatigue?
UK events industry eyes September 2020 as recovery date
Another recipe to try at home
 
 
Aus economy predicted to lose $35.7 billion from cancelled business events
 
New figures released by the Business Events Council of Australia (BECA) have shown that the Australian economy is set to lose $35.7 billion in direct expenditure over the next 12 months due to business event cancellations.
 
The data, which resulted from a study of businesses across the business events industry, projects that a further $17.2 billion in direct value to the economy will be wiped out – on top of the loss of direct expenditure – as a result of the global pandemic.
 
The figures also showed that more than 92,000 industry job losses are expected between the end of 2019 and June 30, 2020.
 
More about this soon...
Are you experiencing Zoom fatigue?
 
Zoom and similar online video technologies are great – they offer a lot of features for meetings and are keeping the industry connected.
 
But, just quietly, we’re getting a little over them. And we’re not alone. There have been rumblings in the industry that too many webinar invites are being sent out, too much content is on offer and that hour-long virtual meetings demand a lot of concentration.
 
The BBC recently spoke with Gianpiero Petriglieri, an associate professor who explores sustainable development and learning in the workplace, about the rise in ‘Zoom fatigue’. According to Petriglieri, video chats consume more energy than in-person ones due to the need to process non-verbal cues like facial expressions; the tone and pitch of voice; and body language. He also said that the awareness of being watched can be very nerve-wracking and stressful, and that silence on video calls can disrupt the rhythm of conversation and increase anxiety.
 
Perhaps disillusionment with video technology is a good thing. It could mean that there will always be a place for face-to-face meetings, and that online events will not become the new normal.
 
Do you have thoughts on the matter? Let us know at digital1@btp.net.au
UK events industry eyes September 2020 as recovery date
 
A survey has found that the UK events industry expects September 2020 to be the most significant month when it comes to post-COVID-19 recovery. The Business Events Sentiment Survey received responses from 556 business events professionals across the UK, and 38 per cent of participants forecasted a rise in enquiry and booking levels in September this year.
 
12 per cent indicated July as the beginning of the recovery period, and 10 per cent believed that the tide will turn in August. Half of respondents believed that the industry as a whole will not return to any form of normality for at least 12 months, with 27 per cent believing that this could be achieved in between nine to 12 months.
 
We wonder what Australian respondents would say in a similar survey.
 
To download the full report, click here. 
Another recipe to try at home
 
Looking for more things to whip up in the kitchen during self-isolation? Look no further. We’ll be including a new recipe each Monday for all of your stay-at-home baking needs.
 
This week’s instalment comes from Tourism Portfolio, which has started sharing recipes from its DMC Partners around the world. UK event company K&N Travel has shared its best recipe for British scones, something that has been baked and enjoyed by brits for centuries.
 
Access the recipe here. 
We welcome your news and input on our sector. Email brad@btp.net.au, helen@btp.net.au, jenny@btp.net.au or digital1@btp.net.au with anything you want to share or say.
 
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